Tuesday, March 8, 2016

Marine Veteran: Drafting Women is Key to Ending Gender Discrimination

From Motto Time: http://motto.time.com/4234492/draft-women-military/

By Kate Germano Feb. 29, 2016
'We can't demand equality on one hand but say we should be excused from the draft solely because of our gender on the other'
The debate about whether women should be required to register for Selective Service and the misguided commentary surrounding it has made one thing clear: Many senior leaders are out of touch with the attitudes of younger Americans. I think this younger generation believes that changing the current system is a natural step toward the elimination of gender discrimination in the military and the establishment of a level playing field for citizenship in America.

The proponents of keeping women in traditional roles assume that requiring us to register for the draft will create such a hue and cry from the public that it will cause officials to reconsider the wisdom of allowing women to serve in combat.

But such comments are highly emotional at best, and at worst, they demonstrate the same benevolent sexist tendencies that have prevented American women from having equal job opportunities and equal pay for decades.

Many men (and women) of a certain era believe that women need to be protected by men because we are not emotionally or physically capable of looking after ourselves. But such individuals fail to comprehend that, in seeking to shelter women from the evils of the world, they deny women the opportunity to succeed in every aspect of society. They also fail to consider that, since the Revolutionary War, women have served in combat “under the radar” and that we possess more ability to successfully wage battle than we are routinely given credit for. 

Of all of the services, the Marine Corps has been the most pedantic when it comes to diversity and cultural evolution. From racial desegregation to the abolition of “Don’t Ask, Don’t Tell” and now the integration of women into ground combat jobs, the service has historically been the slowest to embrace change. 

Over the past 12 months, the online commentary from current and former Marines has revealed significant fault lines in how male Marines perceive and treat female Marines. While I was the commanding officer of the only all-female unit in the Marine Corps, I experienced incredible pushback from my superiors when it came to trying to improve the performance of my recruits and Marines. I felt my superiors were quick to apply much harsher evaluative leadership criteria to me than to my male counterparts. Their characterization of me as an abusive leader was a clear example of the damned if you do, damned if you don’t scenarios women experience every day in both the military and civilian sectors. (I was fired after being characterized as “mean” by Marines I was simply holding accountable—an expectation for any leader in the Corps.)


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